PAST PROJECTS




  • IMPLEMENTING THE ARCTIC STRATEGY IN TRAINING
    Teaching Mariners to Operate Safely In The Arctic
    The International Marine Organization (IMO) Polar Code recently enacted training requirements for masters, chief mates, and officers operating in polar waters. In anticipation of the new Polar Code, ADAC partners at the Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) developed a basic ice navigation course which received approval from the U.S. Coast Guard. In spring of 2017, 22 students at Maine Maritime Academy enrolled in and completed the class. They received certification for the basic ice navigation class from the U.S. Coast Guard, making them the first in the country to hold a basic IMO Polar Code ice navigation certificate. MMA is now working to develop an advanced ice navigation course which adds bridge simulator scenarios and is suited to train mariner masters and first mates in IMO Polar Code in difficult ice navigation situations.

    Full Project Description
  • ARCTIC INFORMATION FUSION CAPABILITY
    Real-time, Mission-critical Information Direct to Arctic Operators
    Arctic Information Fusion Capability (AIFC) aims to bring together data streams from a broad range of sources in the Arctic and make them available through a single, intuitive portal that can be utilized by decision makers ranging from operational commanders to tactical operators to community-based observers. AIFC combines two dimensional geographic orientation of precision mapping data, near-real-time and high resolution satellite imagery, modeling, sensors, web based communications, and appropriate social networking feeds to gain domain awareness in support of operational decision making and responders in the field. In short, AIFC’s goal is to put all the up-to-the-minute information needed for an operation in the Arctic at the fingertips of those who need it most.

    Full Project Description
    Project Video
  • LOW-COST REMOTE SENSORS
    A New Approach to Monitoring the World’s Most Remote Areas
    ADAC’s Low-Cost Sensor project aims to develop an inexpensive, easily-deployed sensor network for detecting environmental or security breach events in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions where there are no reliable sources of communication or power. Using a network architecture modeled after the neurons in the human brain, these sensors can be deployed in large numbers on short notice to areas of interest to Arctic operators and emergency response personnel. By transmitting information between one another, without centralized direction, such a network can “self heal” and provide continuous streams of data even if individual sensors are destroyed or go offline. The robustness and flexibility of this kind of network will allow decision makers to quickly establish monitoring of large, remote areas and maintain it for extended periods without risking more valuable assets and human lives.

    Full Project Description
    Project Video
  • Community Based Observer Networks for Situational Awareness
    Using Local Knowledge to Enhance Arctic Domain Awareness
    This project researches methods to establish a useful community-based observing network and system (CBONS) enabled by the Field Information Support Tool (FIST) for the purpose of acquiring fine scale, local data on a range of variables critical to USCG Operations. Variables will include those associated with search and rescue issues, environmental conditions, marine vessel transits, operational domain awareness, and maritime situational awareness. In order to highlight the enabling capability of the FIST technology, the project team describes the project as CBONS-FIST. A systematic and quality assured CBONS-FIST will enhance the Coast Guard’s ability to respond successfully to a range of missions, including Arctic-related Incidents of National Significance (Arctic IoNS).

    Full Project Description